Hue’s Reviews: Memphis, Martin, and The Mountaintop by Alice Faye Duncan

Dreamers never quit. Watercolor paintings and free verse support a child’s recollection of an oft-forgotten portion of history: The 1968 Sanitation Workers’ Strike in Memphis, Tennessee. Little Lorraine Jackson witnesses her parents, including her father, a garbage worker, fight for a freedom that’s never free, while gaining hope and peaceful support from Dr. Martin Luther […]

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#Friday Reads

Happy Friday, Everyone! Another week’s passed. More books conquered. Hungry bibliophiles seek books to feed their ravings. Next week, I’ll return to Philadelphia (my hometown) for two weeks. Of course, I’ll shop bookstores and any book-loving avenues there. Also, as expected, I will travel with two books at my disposal. What are they? Goodreads From […]

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Hue’s Classics: Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl

An unflinching account of Harriet Jacobs’ life as woman “living” as a slave. I place living in quotations to demonstrate the difference between living a life, which connotes freedom, and surviving a life, which illustrates a resemblance of a life within another’s desire to wrap cruel albatrosses around your neck, proverbial and literal. Ms. Jacobs’ […]

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Hue’s Reviews: New People

How do you identify? Has your identity opened an inescapable void? How far will you go to authenticate your identity? In Danzy Senna’s “New People”, she satirizes what life means as the desired mulatto – new person – and what one’s life means existing in an accepted schizophrenic reality. Meet Maria. Seductive and mysterious. She’s […]

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Hue’s Reviews: Simon and the Homo-Sapien Agenda

Sixteen-year-old and not-so-openly gay Simon Spier prefers to save his drama for the school musical. But when an email falls into the wrong hands, his secret is at risk of being thrust into the spotlight. Now Simon is actually being blackmailed: if he doesn’t play wingman for class clown Martin, his sexual identity will become […]

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Hue’s Reviews: Tiny Pretty Things

(I’m reading a bit slower than usual. While I catch up, here’a previous book I’ve reviewed that’s worthy of reading.) Ballet fascinates me. Lean bodies lunge and fly at will. Pointe shoes and dance skirts flutter, carrying the weight of their owners. Beautiful gazelles. However, the beauty on stage fades in the backdrop of serious […]

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Hue’s Reviews: Full Cicada Moon

Marilyn Hilton’s Full Cicada Moon draws comparison to Jacqueline Woodson’s Brown Girl Dreaming and we are the wiser and fulfilled for having more to enjoy. Plot In 1969 Vermont, Mimi Oliver trudges through her coming of age, tackling self-identity, her love for astronomy, and first crush. Her father works for a local college, and as a black […]

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Hue’s Reviews: What We Lose

Raised in Pennsylvania, Thandi views the world of her mother’s childhood in Johannesburg as both impossibly distant and ever present. She is an outsider wherever she goes, caught between being black and white, American and not. She tries to connect these dislocated pieces of her life, and as her mother succumbs to cancer, Thandi searches […]

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Hue’s Reviews: The Mothers

Every Sunday in every Baptist church lies a thousand stories. Some imagined. Some whispered. Some embellished. Over Sunday dinner plates and soft hums uttered by the grand dames, narrators share them. Some warm your heart and some divide your soul. They compel you to stare at the faces of the pastor, the choir director, and […]

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Hue’s Reviews: Juliet Takes a Breath

19 year-old Juliet Palante left the Bronx to venture through hipster Portland, Oregon to discover herself via an internship with her favorite author, Harlowe Brisbane, a feminist writer, a celesbian (portmanteau of celebrity and lesbian), and authority on women’s bodies. Prior to leaving, she came out to her family, deepening the rocky terrain she’ll cobble […]

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Hue’s Reviews: Akata Witch

Akata Witch transports the reader to a magical place where nothing is quite as it seems. Born in New York, but living in Aba, Nigeria, twelve-year old Sunny is understandably a little lost. She is albino and thus, incredibly sensitive to the sun. All Sunny wants to do is be able to play football and […]

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Hue’s Reviews: Another Brooklyn

Running into a long-ago friend sets memories from the 1970s in motion for August, transporting her to a time and a place where friendship was everything—until it wasn’t. For August and her girls, sharing confidences as they ambled through neighborhood streets, Brooklyn was a place where they believed that they were beautiful, talented, brilliant—a part […]

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Hue’s Reviews: Allegedly

Struggle porn irks me. What’s struggle porn? It’s constant pain, struggle, or hardship-marked entertainment disguised as “message opportunities”. Books, movies, t.v. shows, and music are the main platforms. Find a person, particularly one of color, and harp as much pain as you can on them with murky messages or none presented by its end. Allegedly […]

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Hue’s Reviews: The Girl Who Fell From the Sky

Rachel, sole survivor of a family tragedy navigates boxes others deem fitting for her. Will she choose, or will she set out to determine who she is on her own terms? The Girl Who Fell From the Sky, a debut book, by Heidi W. Durrow, paints a picture of a young girl, born to an African-American […]

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Remember the Classics #1: Sula

I’ve lived forty years without reading Toni Morrison. I’ve lived as a literary heathen for forty years. But, Sula baptized my sins away as I washed in the glory of Ms. Morrison’s words. I fell in love with Sula. I fell in love with a woman deemed Satan personified. I fell in love with her, […]

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Hue’s Reviews: The Hate U Give

Sixteen year-old Starr Carter wears a mask daily: one in her poor, black neighborhood and one in the rich and predominately white neighborhood where she attends an elite school. But, for unbeknownst to those around her, masks tire and tighten with each passing day. The balance between managing the tightness and fatigue comes to a […]

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Hue’s Reviews: To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before

Do not worry. My mug of tea sits beside me as I type this review. Jenny Han’s novel, To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before invokes frustration and side-eyes from other planets. I promise to keep my feelings civil, even when the book urges me to forget civility. We live in society pushing various books, […]

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Hue’s Reviews: The Sun is Also a Star

Does fate exist? Can we meet someone one day that will change us for years to come? What measures would we travel to change course? The Sun is Also a Star considers these questions. Meet Daniel, a Korean-American kid dealing with immigrant dreams placed upon him before birth. He wants to attend college, major in […]

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Hue’s Reviews: The Education of Margot Sanchez

Margot wants to be someone else. However, her family, friends, and pseudo-community will guarantee her desire won’t happen. The Education of Margot Sanchez is a coming of age story featuring a Latina coping with two masks: the one she wears when she’s at Somerset Prep and it’s ritzy, privileged crowd and the one, more geared […]

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